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Issue 22

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Varying Menus: The Advent of Modified Fast Food

Dorothea Baerthlein from Germany


Dorothea Baerthlein tries some fast food.
Photo:
Winfried Baerthlein
As life becomes more hectic, time to cook and eat lunch or dinner leisurely in a traditional way seems to be rare. Does that mean hamburgers and fried chicken have to be consumed all over the world?

 

Kimchiburger, riceburger, (Unfortunately, I have not yet found a Bratwurstburger.) —new ways to create fast food?

The American idea of fast food restaurants has been successfully adopted around the globe. As life becomes more hectic, time to cook and eat lunch or dinner leisurely in a traditional way seems to be rare.

Does that mean hamburgers and fried chicken have to be consumed all over the world? Certainly not.

Fast food, modified to suit other cultural tastes, has already been introduced to some Asian countries. Koreans prefer to have a "kimchiburger" for lunch instead of a cheeseburger which doesn't satisfy their taste. Riceburgers are more accepted than french fries by Japanese people.

Many other countries will follow and create their own styles of fast food. The traditional German fast food "bratwurstbrotchen" does not need to be modified as it has remained a tradition for many, many years.

Offering fast food in varieties of cultural cooking traditions is a satisfying compromise. It keeps the heritage and considers the need for time-saving.


More on cooking and eating trends:
Avocado Rolls: A New Japanese Food? | In Japan, Men are Learning to Cook
In Korea, Both Men and Women are Cooking | People in Korea are Eating More Vegetables 

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