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Street
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Issue 16

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Hot food stand
Photo: Sandy Peters
Street food stands are very popular in Korea. They take their name from the two kinds of hot foods they sell: Dukbokgi and Odeng
. (Food stand in Chilsuk)

Hot food stand
Photo: Sandy Peters
Dukbokgi is a spicy hot food made of rice cakes and some vegetables with spicy dressing. These rice cakes are finger-shaped. They are mixed with sliced vegetables in a pan with a spicy red dressing. (Food stand in Seoul)

Hot food stand
Photo: Sandy Peters
Each food stand has its own recipes for its food; for example, some like to add sugar or other special ingredients in the food. (Food stand in Chilsuk)

Hot Food Stands in Korea

Hye-Mi Cho from Korea

Street food stands are very popular in Korea. They take their name from the two kinds of hot foods they sell: Dukbokgi and Odeng.

Dukbokgi is a spicy hot food made of rice cakes and some vegetables with spicy dressing. These rice cakes are finger-shaped. They are white, and they are about ten centimeters in length and about 1. 5 centimeters in diameter.

They are mixed with sliced vegetables in a pan with a spicy red dressing. Fifteen minutes later, they are ready to eat.

Odeng is made of ground fish. It comes in various shapes: some are square, others are round, and still others are stick style. You can buy big or small ones.

At these food stands, you can also eat Odeng, which has been boiled in a pot. It's served on a long stick so you can eat it easily, and it's eaten with soy sauce.

The food sold at these stands is not expensive, compared to what other foods in Korea cost. Each Dukbokgi and Odeng costs about twenty to fifty cents, depending on the owner.

Each food stand has its own recipes for its food; for example, some like to add sugar or other special ingredients in the food. Usually, there is just one owner, but if the food stand is big, there may be two or three owners.

When I was an elementary school student, I used to stop at one of these stands everyday after school to eat this food because I liked it so much.

Near my school, there was a Dukbokgi and Odeng food stand which was and still is famous in my hometown. I remember standing there many times eating O-deng with soup.

More street stands:
Story Book Stands in China | Anything Can Happen at a Brazilian News Stand
A Night Market Foos Stand in Taiwan | Fish Stands at the Turkish Seaside
The Mood of Korean Food Stands | Lottery Stands in Korea

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