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Violence in
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Issue 12

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Video Game Violence Effects Children

Two international students from Switzerland and one from Russia share their ideas the effects of video game violence on children.


Video Games Lead to Aggressive Behavior

Silvia Bopp from Switzerland

Since increasing violence has become a part of our culture today, we have to think about its influence on children and adults.

Video games
Photo: Sandy Peters
When you play the game, you have to react fast and kill as many persons as you can. You have to destroy somehting. This behavior I would call destructive; you have to build a tidal wave of aggression to win the game.

Video games today are mostly violent. My own experience tells me that the impact of playing these kinds of games is enormously negative even though some children and adults get a good feeling playing them.

When you play a game like that, you have to react fast, and you have to kill as many persons as you can. You have to destroy something, and finally, you have to survive. This behavior I would call destructive; you have to develop a tidal wave of aggression to win the game.

Obviously, there is no doubt that it has a certain negative influence on children. If children play video games constantly, they are likely to feel restless, aggressive, and combative.

In video games, they have their own world where they are allowed to do everything thay want. It can be a way of calming down frustration, but if there is too much consumption of destruction, a child might tend to overreact because he is not able to handle in his mind what he has just experienced.


Violent Video Games Desensitize Kids

Nicole Meier from Switzerland

Even if it is only a game, kids become more and more desensitized. For them it is fun and later they can't distinguish between reality and fantasy.

Almost every child has already played video games or has his own game boy. I think in some video games there is too much violence and it influences youngsters, teaching them the wrong values.

In violent video games such as Duke Nukem 3D, kids kill many people and blow up many places without any reason. Even if it is only a game, kids become more and more desensitized. For them it is fun and later they can't distinguish between reality or fantasy. These kids have some problems at school and are more restless and combative thatn others.

Also, their attention span decreases because they are used to seeing action all the time. Unfortunately, there are guns which look real and are used for playing video games. Whenever these children are exposed to a real gun which belongs to the father, they are in danger. They still think this is a fake gun and start to play and sometimes somebody gets hurt or is even killed.

Violent video games are ruining children and parents should monitor which games they can play. Even if there is a rating system like for movies, youngsters find a way to play them. It is easy to go to another place like the home of a friend to play these violent games.


Video Games Promote the Wrong Values

Max Popov from Russia

Children easily become addicted to video games, and the aggressive content of some of these video games can unknowingly cause them to behave aggressively.

I think that video games include too much violence. Children who watch and play these games can be impacted by very aggressive content. Even though they like to play strategy games where they figure out how to kill someone, they don't understand that they are becoming aggressive. Those video games promote the wrong values and sometimes a very evil reaction.

Before video games were made some years ago, teens played some sports and read books. Now, instead of taking part in those activities, they have computers.

Teens get addicted to these games very fast. For example, they can spend a whole day playing a video game in which they shoot and kill some monsters or enemies. Sometimes they forget to do their homework and other things. They enter a new unreal world in which they may enjoy virtual reality.


More on media violence

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